4 Sustainable brands Meghan Markle has backed up

Meghan Markle, aka the Duchess of Sussex, has been closely observed by many since her engagement to Prince Harry. She has been using this opportunity to shine a spotlight on many sustainable brands. Celebrities using their platform to promote conscious and sustainable fashion is not new. To bring awareness about sustainable fashion, Cate Blanchett re-wore her 2014 Golden Globes dress at 2018 Cannes Film Festival. In collaboration with Calvin Klein and Eco-Age, Emma Watson wore a dress made of recycled plastic bottles at 2016 Met Gala. Versace created an eco-friendly dress made from GOTS certified silk and cotton for Gisele Bündchen (2018 Met Gala). Moreover, we have celebrities who have established brands to fight for ethical products and sustainable living. Read our blog on “Six Celebrity Women Making Their Mark With Sustainable Brands” here. That being said, when a member of Royal family promotes sustainable brands it is a huge deal.

Below are 4 sustainable brands the Duchess has embraced:

Reformation

Reformation’s ‘Pineapple’ maxi dress was worn by Meghan on her 2-week tour to Australia, Fiji, New Zealand, and the Kingdom of Tonga.

About Reformation:

Reformation is an American company based in California. They have been known to put sustainability at the core of everything they do from manufacturing to their store to their office. You can sign up to receive their quarterly sustainability reports and read previous quarterly reports on their website. They track and offset environmental footprint of every product. At their offices, they use LED lighting and Energy Star-rated appliances. To encourage their employees (HQ Team) to use public transportation, they offer Metro passes.

Other celebrities including Kendall Jenner, Irina Shayk and Ashley Graham have also seen wearing Reformation.


Veja

The Duchess wore Veja’s environmentally conscious sneakers during her trip to Sydney. 

 

About Veja:

Veja is a French company headquartered in Paris. Their shoes are made in Brazil. Veja purchases rubber and cotton directly from the producers in Brazil. Since 2017, all the cotton they use has been organic. Veja pre-finances harvests, as much as 40% (organic cotton). In 2017, Veja factory employees made an average of 1,335 R$ per month while the minimum wage in Brazil was 937 R$. Their factories follow International Labour Organisation (ILO) rules. They do not spend any resources in ads and are open about their producers, factories, and employees. Additionally, they have also been open about their restraints. Their laces are not made of organic cotton and they use conventional dye.

Emily Ratajkowski, Emma Watson, Chloe Grace Moretz, and Eddie Redmayne have also seen wearing Veja’s shoes.


Rothy’s

Meghan wore a pair of Rothy’s during her trip to Melbourne.  

About Rothy’s

Rothy’s was founded by Roth Martin and Stephen Hawthornwaite. Its headquarters are in San Francisco, CA. They make washable flats and shoes made of recycled plastic bottles. Rothy’s was founded when Roth and Stephen realized that sustainability was growing but it was not yet stylish or comfortable. They have diverted millions of plastic water bottles (34,554,976 and counting) from the landfills to make their shoes. Their outsoles are eco-friendly, made from vegan, recyclable, carbon-free rubber and TPU. The shoe’s outsoles contain bio-based castor oil and recycled materials. They also offset their carbon emissions in partnership with The Envira Amazonia Project. Additionally, they provide health and wellness perks to all employees, including the ones at their headquarters, workshop in China and more.


Stella McCartney

The Duchess has been seen wearing Stella McCartney on several occasions including her wedding reception.

 About Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney founded her company after her own name in partnership with Kering. She is a lifelong vegetarian and do not use any leather, skin, feathers, or fur in her products. Stella sources sustainable materials as much as possible. She believes treating everyone in their supply chain with respect and dignity. Her company is also working to reduce the environmental impacts of their metal consumption by investing in low-impact, recycled or recyclable metals.


Have you used any of these brand’s products? We would love to hear your thoughts.